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A holiday where we can be luminously human

Posted 11/24/15

We can’t tell you how to celebrate your Thanksgiving holiday. It’s a personal thing, whether it’s with a turkey dinner or a vegan feast, a family get-together or a football binge in front of the TV.

For some, it’s a symbol of the …

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A holiday where we can be luminously human

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We can’t tell you how to celebrate your Thanksgiving holiday. It’s a personal thing, whether it’s with a turkey dinner or a vegan feast, a family get-together or a football binge in front of the TV.


For some, it’s a symbol of the oppression of a native people. How you see it is how you see it.


But whether you use Thanksgiving as a history lesson, a chance to reunite with relatives or a mission to grab discounted merchandise during Black Friday sales at local stores, we suggest you take the time to truly be thankful for the good things in life.


Even in a world filled with too much ugliness, there is beauty and hope. Even in a world filled with too much animus, too much stress, too little time to enjoy its splendor.


In these times, where more is better, where there’s no time to stop and simply count our blessings for what we got, we need to pause and consider the gifts of life – family, friends, nature, special moments, happy memories, all things that have made our existence luminously human.


We compromise nothing by stopping on Thanksgiving and considering the good things.


It was Abraham Lincoln who signed a presidential proclamation in 1863 that chose a uniform date for Thanksgiving in all of the states. In 1941, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a joint resolution of Congress that made the fourth Thursday of November the Thanksgiving holiday. It’s interesting that Roosevelt had tried to make that day the official holiday on his own two years earlier, hoping that celebrating Thanksgiving on that Thursday would give the country an economic boost.
Now retail stores are fighting to lure us into their aisles and checkout lines on Thanksgiving Day itself.


There’s been a backlash against those retailers who would force their employees to work on Thanksgiving instead of celebrating it at home with family and friends. Whatever your stand, no matter where you are on Thanksgiving, we hope you take a moment to consider all of the beautiful things in our world, and in your life. Shopping sprees and the presidential pardoning of turkeys aside: It’s that personal act that makes Thanksgiving profoundly meaningful.


Have a happy Thanksgiving.

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