locally owned since 1854

Borough wants longer light at Main and Union streets

By Dan Miller

danmiller@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 10/10/18

Middletown borough hopes to ease traffic congestion at the crowded Main and Union street intersection by adding more time to the green light for vehicles in both directions on Main.

The change …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Borough wants longer light at Main and Union streets

Posted

Middletown borough hopes to ease traffic congestion at the crowded Main and Union street intersection by adding more time to the green light for vehicles in both directions on Main.

The change would increase from 40 to 48 seconds how long the light stays green during peak times for traffic both east and west bound on Main Street at the intersection with Union, borough Manager Ken Klinepeter told the Press & Journal in an email.

Peak times are from 6 to 9 a.m. and from 3 to 6 p.m.

The change must be approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, because Main Street is a state-owned road — Route 230.

Borough council during its Oct. 2 meeting passed a resolution authorizing Klinepeter apply to PennDOT requesting the change. It will cost the borough $2,000 to add the time to the green light.

Klinepeter said the borough wanted to see the green light extended for more than eight seconds in both directions.

However, the eight seconds was based upon traffic counts that were included in a study of the intersection that was done this year by the borough’s consulting engineers, HRG.

Council had the study done in an attempt to add a left-turn arrow signal to make it easier for east-bound traffic on Main to turn left onto North Union Street. But PennDOT concluded that the left-turn signal was not warranted, based upon results of the traffic study by HRG.

The borough also will not be putting in place a change suggested by resident Bob Hauser that the traffic light at the Main and Union intersection stay red in all directions to make it safer for pedestrians to cross the street.

A traffic safety engineer working for the borough recommended against the change, saying it is “not standard practice,” Klinepeter said.

The engineer did recommend giving pedestrians more time to cross the intersection, by increasing the walk/don’t walk signal timing from 23 to 26 seconds going from east to west, and from 25 to 27 seconds on the north/south crossing, Klinepeter said.