locally owned since 1854

UPS hub might bring hundreds of jobs to area

Posted 7/5/17

United Parcel Service Inc. could be coming to Lower Swatara Township, and along with it hundreds of jobs.

Officials from UPS presented a proposal to the board of commissioners Wednesday, June …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

UPS hub might bring hundreds of jobs to area

Posted

United Parcel Service Inc. could be coming to Lower Swatara Township, and along with it hundreds of jobs.

Officials from UPS presented a proposal to the board of commissioners Wednesday, June 21, which would bring a UPS transportation hub to 2134 N. Union St.

According to UPS public relations director Susan Rosenberg, a hub is where the tractor-trailers are unloaded, sorted and reloaded with packages destined for other locations in the country or packages that are entering central Pennsylvania. It would be a regional hub and would service the northeast United States.

According to Steve Slifer, the vice president of global real estate for UPS, there is a site evaluation process with many factors. These factors are employment base, transportation infrastructure, projected package volume growth for the region, and community support. After evaluating these factors, officials believe the above address, in the northeast corner of the township behind the quarry, would suffice their needs.

“An important factor in making our decision where to locate the hub will in fact, be how quickly we can go live. Time is of the essence and UPS is highly motivated to begin work on this project,” Slifer told the board.

According to Slifer, in the first year of operation, there could be 900 total employees combined between full-time and part-time at the hub, with that number increasing to 1,250 total employees by the sixth year.

The annual real estate taxes on this facility would be between $1 million to almost $1.5 million. School taxes would be anywhere from $700,000 to $1 million annually.

Plans call for the hub to have an unloading/loading area, a vehicle maintenance shop, a fueling station, a vehicle wash tunnel, and employee and customer parking. Information on how big the building would be was unavailable.

Construction and land costs would be $210 million, the fully automated sortation system would be $187 million, infrastructure improvements, which include mitigating any traffic concerns, road improvements, and improvements to utilities would be $20 million for a total of $417 million.

Lower Swatara Township Board of Commissioners president Jon Wilt called the move a “positive thing” given how much of an economical impact the move would have on the township, school district, and county, especially if Three Mile Island closes in a little more than two years.

“I see it as a win-win,” Wilt said.

Before any of this can happen, a text change to the zoning ordinance must occur. According to Robert Greene, the Lower Swatara planning/zoning coordinator, this means the proposed site area does not recognize warehouses as a permitted use in that area, so the text must be changed to allow a warehouse to be built there.

In addition, the planning commission board is required to have at least one meeting regarding this decision and there must be at least one public hearing by the board for residents to voice their opinions and concerns.

Wilt said the public hearing is scheduled for Thursday, July 20, at the Lower Swatara fire house, 1350 Fulling Mill Road.

After the required meetings, if all goes well, the petition would be given to the township planning commission, the county planning commission, and finally, back to the township commissioners for the final decision.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment