locally owned since 1854

Community pride grows with events, beautification: Editorial

Posted 9/27/17

Why do some communities have more pride than others?

Is it a sense of history? Is it the attitudes of the people who live there? The businesses that have roots? The sports teams? The schools? The …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Community pride grows with events, beautification: Editorial

Posted

Why do some communities have more pride than others?

Is it a sense of history? Is it the attitudes of the people who live there? The businesses that have roots? The sports teams? The schools? The events that are held to bring residents together? Maybe it’s the way the community looks, its streets lined with well-kept homes, well-watered flowers and well-decorated intersections.

We don’t have a definitive answer, but we are sure it’s a mix of all these factors.

We believe that community pride is most evident in people’s hearts and minds when they are attending community events. That’s why it’s so important that things such as the Pumpkin Fest at the Middletown Home, held on Sept. 17, and the Kuppy’s Diner Cruise-In, held Sept. 21 and chronicled elsewhere in this edition, are so important.

Having places to go and things to do make a community stronger.

Seeing people out and about enjoying themselves helps establish that sense of pride, that we are in a community where people are proud to call home.

It didn’t hurt that the weather was spectacular for either of those events. But it is more than that. 

In the case of the Pumpkin Fest, it took many, many volunteers to make it happen. Penn State Harrisburg students made up a chunk of those helpers. You saw young and old, relaxing and enjoying the event.

With the cruise-in, Kuppy’s Diner helped show off what has been years in the making: a beautified key area in the heart of Middletown.

Think about how far the stretch of Union Street around Emaus and Brown streets has come in recent years. The streetscape added flair. There are beautiful flowers hanging on poles. There are Hometown Heroes banners everywhere. The unattractive retail shops in front of the McNair House have been torn down and now the building is for sale, potentially adding more of a draw to the area. The Tattered Flag is open for business. Even stretching up to the square, the flowerbeds at the corner of Union and Main streets have never looked better. 

Take note of all these things. They didn’t happen by chance, and they didn’t happen overnight. The events, the flowers, the streetscape — all of them are because a resident, a business owner, or an elected official wanted to improve our community.

Our community isn’t perfect. Many struggle with the growth coming along the Harrisburg Pike, or the expansion of Penn State Harrisburg, or the potential addition of a UPS distribution hub in Lower Swatara Township. 

Change isn’t easy. But change for the better should be applauded.

When you mention Middletown to people who don’t live here or don’t know it well, they might think of Three Mile Island or Harrisburg International Airport or Penn State Harrisburg (ironically, none of which are actually in the borough). But this area is more than that.

Well-run, enjoyable events such as the Pumpkin Fest and the cruise-in help draw people here, and allow them to see what we can offer.

We should be proud, and all do our parts to continue to grow that pride.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment