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Entitlement is holding us back

Posted 1/7/14

A number of weeks ago, I viewed a C-SPAN 2 program where a co-author of the book, “America 3.0 – American Prosperity in the 21st Century” outlined the painful transitional phases the U.S. has undergone in both the past and the present. …

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Entitlement is holding us back

Posted

A number of weeks ago, I viewed a C-SPAN 2 program where a co-author of the book, “America 3.0 – American Prosperity in the 21st Century” outlined the painful transitional phases the U.S. has undergone in both the past and the present. The presentation was so compelling and logical on its face that I bought the book and read it cover to cover, with few interruptions.

Here is a quick synopsis. 

 

The first part of the book, America 1.0, describes the motivations and mindset of the early settlers, where cultural bases of hard work and self-reliance were principal factors determining their fate in this primitive, undeveloped country. Evidently, these inherent traits served them well, since we are all here today.

Part Two of the book identifies America 2.0 as the start of the Industrial Revolution, and describes this transitional phase in America’s history, where the harnessing of energy resources and the complementary invention and use of labor-saving equipment transformed this nation from an agrarian to a manufacturing-based economy. 

It also chronicles the painful realities for many folks at that time, folks whose manual labor farming skills were devalued since mechanical inventions dramatically increased output and reduced the need for physical labor. Having no other option, these displaced folks headed for the cities and had to master new skills to obtain long-term employment.

It also notes many of these same basic tenants still exist today, where the skillsets of many folks are continually made obsolete by the technological advances of our highly-mechanized and information-based economy . . .

 

Noelle Barrett: 717-944-4628, or noellebarrett@pressandjournal.com