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First aid, CPR part of Boy Scouts being prepared

Posted 4/10/18

“Be Prepared” is the longstanding Boy Scout motto, and Londonderry Township’s Troop 97 takes that vow to heart.

The boys spent an entire weekend learning CPR and first aid …

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First aid, CPR part of Boy Scouts being prepared

Posted

“Be Prepared” is the longstanding Boy Scout motto, and Londonderry Township’s Troop 97 takes that vow to heart.

The boys spent an entire weekend learning CPR and first aid procedures to help those in need.  Videos, classroom instruction and hands-on stations were all used during the recent “Disaster Days” program.

Emergency medical technicians and certified American Heart Association cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructors Jayson Trostle and Bryan Duquin spent the weekend with 25 Scouts and leaders teaching them how to handle emergency scenarios. The instruction was designed to make the Scouts better prepared as responders as Scouts are often first responders in emergency situations. 

Trostle and Duquin taught CPR methods that would benefit adult and pediatric patients. They also taught the group how to operate automatic electronic defibrillator devices. As a result, 17 Scouts and eight adults became certified by the American Heart Association.

The experts set up simulated emergency scenarios. Tim Nissley, deputy chief of the Londonderry Fire Company, helped assist in the first aid training classes and senior Scouts were used as demonstrators during the hands-on sessions.

The Scouts were taught how to assess a situation, identify the problem and how to follow that up with proper first aid until emergency help arrives. A wide variety of situations were reviewed that taught them how to adapt their treatment method to the health issue and environment.

Heat stroke, heat exhaustion, shock, dehydration, hypothermia and hyperventilation were all reviewed. They also learned what to do when a patient stops breathing, has been poisoned or is bleeding profusely.

Treating puncture wounds and first aid for simple cuts and scrapes, blisters on the hand and foot, minor burns, insect and tick bites or stings, venomous snake bites, frostbite, nosebleeds, sunburn and bites from suspected rabid animals were reviewed in detail.

All of these situations are possible to present themselves during a remote camping trip.

Remote first aid was a favorite course. The Scouts learned how to transport a patient with tree limbs and a sleeping bag and how to make bandages from ripped-up T-shirts, as well as how to make splints out of tree branches.

The Scouts learned how to identify signs of stroke and heart attack and how to treat a patient until emergency personnel arrive.

The weekend helped them prepare for their remote camping trips as well as educated them to come to the aid of neighbors. The majority of the participants will advance to a more in-depth class of wilderness and remote first aid at Camp Tuckahoe in Dillsburg in order to prepare them for a weeklong canoeing, fishing and camping trip in the backwaters of Ontario, Canada this summer.

Recent and upcoming events for Troop 97 include egg-making at Geyers United Methodist Church, serving at the Londonderry Fire Company fish fries, wilderness/remote first aid at Camp Tuckahoe in Dillsburg, camping at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Cumberland County with a side trip to a trampoline park, Fort Frederick Market Fair campout in Maryland, and Hill Island canoeing and camping.

For more information, contact Kevin Little at 717-944-1957 or Ted Pauley at 717-944-2706. 

Troop 97 is sponsored by Londonderry Fire Company.