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Former police officer Hiester running for mayor; Curry is not on unofficial ballot; Reddinger out of council race

By Dan Miller, danmiller@pressandjournal.com
Posted 3/7/17

The race for Middletown mayor just got a lot more interesting.

Richard Hiester, who just retired at the end of December after 26 years as a Middletown police officer, is running for mayor on the …

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Former police officer Hiester running for mayor; Curry is not on unofficial ballot; Reddinger out of council race

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Editor's note: The original version of this story contained incorrect information about getting on the May primary ballot. The version of the story below has been corrected.

The race for Middletown mayor just got a lot more interesting.

Richard Hiester, who just retired at the end of December after 26 years as a Middletown police officer, is running for mayor on the Republican ballot. He filed nominating papers with Dauphin County on Monday, March 6.

Mayor James H. Curry III, who first was elected in 2013, is not listed on the unofficial ballot posted by the county office of Elections and Voter Registration on the county website as running for any office.

A text to Curry was not returned.

Candidates had until 4:30 p.m. Tuesday to file papers with Dauphin County to be on the Democratic or Republican ballot for the May 16 primary.

Candidates who missed the March 7 deadline will not appear on the ballot of the May 16 primary, said county director of Elections and Voter Registration Gerald Feaser.

Curry can run a write-in campaign for the primary if he so chooses.·Or, the mayor can skip the primary entirely and file nomination papers to appear on the ballot of the Nov. 7 general election as an independent or a third-party candidate, Feaser said.

Candidates can start filing nomination papers to appear on the Nov. 7 ballot as an independent or third-party candidate beginning on Wednesday, March 8. The papers must be filed with the county by Aug. 1 to appear on the general election ballot, Feaser said.

March 22 is the deadline for all candidates who have filed to withdraw their name from the ballot. April 17 is the last day for voters to register to vote for the May 16 primary.

Hiester will face off in the May 16 primary against Republican Robert Givler, another retired Middletown borough police officer who ran for mayor in 2013 and lost to Curry.

In his reasons for running, Hiester said the borough has “neglected” emergency services in recent years. For example, the “seat of borough government” still does not have emergency back-up power since December 2011, when a malfunction knocked out the emergency generators, Hiester said.·

“There is no permanent provision in case we lose power for an extended period, such as in a flood. There are so many other things that need attention and that’s where my focus will be, to keep the people of Middletown safe,” he said.

That both Givler and Hiester are retired from the MPD is relevant, as the mayor under the Pennsylvania borough code is in charge of the police department.

“The good stewards of our money and our services I think are a thing of the past. I believe that we can get more for the money that we have, and I believe that we can demand better of some of our services,” Hiester said. “The primary responsibility of the mayor is to oversee the ‘when the crap hits the fan’ moment. I don’t have a lot of experience with the group that was here for four years and what they have done with emergency services, but as a recently retired police officer I think there are things we could be doing better, and as such I’m the person that can shed some light on that.”


Middletown Borough Council
As for Middletown Borough Council, it looks like the seven-member council will have at least two new faces come 2018.
Of the four incumbents whose seats are up in 2017, Anne Einhorn is not running for re-election, nor is Ian Reddinger.
Reddinger — appointed in 2016 to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Greg Wilsbach — had earlier said he planned to run for a full four-year term. However on March 7, Reddinger disclosed he had decided against running for “personal and family” reasons.
Otherwise, incumbent President Ben Kapenstein is on the Democratic ballot seeking election to the one two-year seat on council. Rachelle Reid, a former councilor, is on the Republican ballot for the two-year seat.
The two-year seat is now held by Democrat Dawn Knull, who was elected in 2015. Knull is now on the Democratic ballot for one of the three four-year seats open on council in 2017.
On the Republican ballot for the four-year seat are challengers Jenny Miller, Rachelle Reid, and David Rhen. Rhen is also a former borough councilor.
Republican incumbent borough Tax Collector Pamela Miller is running for re-election. No one is on the Democratic ballot.

MASD School Board
Six seats are open on the 9-member board, and there are six candidates.
For the four four-year seats that are open, four candidates are on the ballot: Mike Corradi of the first block of Heatherland Road, Melvin Fager Jr. of Briarcliff Road, Darnell Montgomery of the 1700 block of Lakeside Drive, and John Ponnett of the 1500 block of Heritage Square. Corradi and Fager are incumbents. Montgomery and Ponnett were both appointed to the board and are running for their first full term.
For the two two-year seats that are open, two candidates have filed on the Republican side: Julie Gomboc-Turyan of the 900 block of Adelia Street, and Brian Keating of the 1300 block of Butter Churn Road. Keating was appointed to the board and is running for a full term.
All six candidates cross-filed.
The other incumbent whose term is up is David John, who had not said publicly either way whether he planned to run. His name is not on the unofficial ballot.

Lower Swatara
Lower Swatara Township has a race for the board of commissioners, where Republicans — incumbents Laddie Springer and Ben Hall, who was appointed to fill the seat vacated by now-state Rep. Tom Mehaffie, plus challengers Chris DeHart and Ronald Paul — are vying for two open seats on the five-member board. No one is on the Democratic ballot.
Incumbent Republican JulieAnn Wilt is seeking re-election as the township tax collector.

District Judge
District 12-2-01 representing Lower Swatara Township, Paxtang borough, and parts of Swatara Township:
Incumbent Mike Smith of the 500 block of Colony Drive is cross-filed on both the Democratic and Republican ballots.
District 12-2-03 representing Middletown and Royalton boroughs and Conewago and Londonderry townships: Incumbent David Judy of the 200 block of North Union Street is cross-filed on both the Democratic and Republican ballots.

Londonderry Township
Supervisor:
Incumbents Michael Geyer and Bart Shellenhammer are on the Republican ballot. There are two seats up for grabs.
Tax collector: Incumbent Loren M. Bowen of the 3000 block of East Harrisburg Pike is on the Republican ballot.

Royalton
Mayor:
Solomon L. Swartz of the 200 block of Adobe Drive is the lone candidate on the Republican ballot. Incumbent Judy Oxenford is not running.
Borough council 1st Ward: Christopher A. Flynn Jr., 100 block of Market Street; and Jody A. Flynn, 100 block of Market Street, are the lone candidates on the Republican ballot seeking two open seats.
Borough council 2nd Ward: No one is on either ballot seeking two open seats.
Tax collector: Incumbent Terri L. Young of the 800 block of Shippen Street is on the Republican ballot.

Highspire
Mayor:
Incumbent Brenda K. Hoerner is the lone candidate on the Republican ballot.
Borough council: Republicans Michael J. Anderson, 200 block of Market Street, Tyler A. Thatcher, 200 block of Market Street, and Georgann Thompson, first block of Paxton Street, are the only candidates seeking three seats on the council.
Tax collector: Incumbent John W. Hoch of the 100 block of Roop Street is on the Republican ballot.

Steelton
Mayor:
Incumbent Thomas Acri is not running for re-election. Three candidates are on the Democratic ballot: Mary J. Carricato of the 2600 block of South 4th Street, Denae House of the 600 block of Ridge Street, and Maria Romano Marcinko of the 2700 block of South 2nd Street.
Borough council (four-year term): Four candidates are on the Democratic ballot seeking three open seats: Al Ausman of the 2600 block of South 3rd Street, William Jones of the 100 block of Franklin Street, Brian Proctor of the 600 block of Pine Street, and Natashia Woods of the 100 block of South Front Street. Dennis Heefner of the 300 block of Swatara Street is on the Republican ballot.
Borough council (two-year term): Three Democrats are on the ballot: Denae House of the 600 block of Ridge Street, William Jones (same as four-year term) and Maria Romano Marcinko of the 2000 block of South Second Street. Heefner is also on the Republican ballot in this race. There is one seat available.
Tax collector: Incumbent Marianne F. Reider of the 2700 block of South 2nd Street is on the Republican ballot.

Steelton-Highspire School Board
Four seats are open on the nine-member board. There are three candidates, two of who cross-filed on both the Democratic and Republican ballots: incumbent Derek L. Lewis of the 100 block of South 4th Street, and Joyce A. Culpepper of the 200 block of North Harrisburg Street. Markis Millberry of the 300 block of Spruce Street filed only on the Democratic ballot.

Lower Dauphin School Board
Region 2 (Hummelstown and South Hanover Township 1st and 2nd precincts):
Incumbents Debra J. Macut and Eric M. Samples, both of Hummelstown, are cross-filed on both the Democratic and Republican ballots seeking two open seats.
Region 3 (East Hanover Township and South Hanover Township 3rd precinct): Incumbent Kevin J. Busher of Hummelstown is cross-filed on both ballots seeking one open seat.

Dauphin County
Prothonotary:
Diane Bowman of Linglestown is on the Democratic ballot and Matthew Krupp of Harrisburg and Evey Zigarelli-Henderson of Harrisburg are on the Republican ballot. Incumbent Steve Farina is not seeking re-election.
Coroner: Incumbent Graham Hetrick is on Republican ballot.
County Judge: Three of 10 county judge seats are open this year. Six candidates have filed on the Democratic ballot: Royce L. Morris of Swatara Township, John J. McNally III of Lower Paxton Township, Edward M. Marsico Jr. of Lower Paxton Township, Michael Rozman of Steelton, Jeffrey T. McGuire of Lower Paxton Township, and incumbent Lori K. Serratelli of Susquehanna Township.
All six of the above have also cross-filed on the Republican ballot. Stephen Moniak of Derry Township is also on the Republican ballot.

Editor's note: The original version of this story contained incorrect information about getting on the May primary ballot. The version of the story below has been corrected.

The race for Middletown mayor just got a lot more interesting.
Richard Hiester, who just retired at the end of December after 26 years as a Middletown police officer, is running for mayor on the Republican ballot. He filed nominating papers with Dauphin County on Monday, March 6.
Mayor James H. Curry III, who first was elected in 2013, is not listed on the unofficial ballot posted by the county office of Elections and Voter Registration on the county website as running for any office.
A text to Curry was not returned.
Candidates had until 4:30 p.m. Tuesday to file papers with Dauphin County to be on the Democratic or Republican ballot for the May 16 primary.

Editor's note: The original version of this story contained incorrect information about getting on the May primary ballot. The version of the story below has been corrected.

The race for Middletown mayor just got a lot more interesting.
Richard Hiester, who just retired at the end of December after 26 years as a Middletown police officer, is running for mayor on the Republican ballot. He filed nominating papers with Dauphin County on Monday, March 6.
Mayor James H. Curry III, who first was elected in 2013, is not listed on the unofficial ballot posted by the county office of Elections and Voter Registration on the county website as running for any office.
A text to Curry was not returned.
Candidates had until 4:30 p.m. Tuesday to file papers with Dauphin County to be on the Democratic or Republican ballot for the May 16 primary.

Candidates who missed the March 7 deadline will not appear on the ballot of the May 16 primary, said county director of Elections and Voter Registration Gerald Feaser.

Curry can run a write-in campaign for the primary if he so chooses.·Or, the mayor can skip the primary entirely and file nomination papers to appear on the ballot of the Nov. 7 general election as an independent or a third-party candidate, Feaser said.

Candidates can start filing nomination papers to appear on the Nov. 7 ballot as an independent or third-party candidate beginning on Wednesday, March 8. The papers must be filed with the county by Aug. 1 to appear on the general election ballot, Feaser said.

March 22 is the deadline for all candidates who have filed to withdraw their name from the ballot. April 17 is the last day for voters to register to vote for the May 16 primary.
Hiester will face off in the May 16 primary against Republican Robert Givler, another retired Middletown borough police officer who ran for mayor in 2013 and lost to Curry.
In his reasons for running, Hiester said the borough has "neglected" emergency services in recent years. For example, the "seat of borough government" still does not have emergency back-up power since December 2011, when a malfunction knocked out the emergency generators, Hiester said.·
"There is no permanent provision in case we lose power for an extended period, such as in a flood. There are so many other things that need attention and that's where my focus will be, to keep the people of Middletown safe," he said.
That both Givler and Hiester are retired from the MPD is relevant, as the mayor under the Pennsylvania borough code is in charge of the police department.
"The good stewards of our money and our services I think are a thing of the past. I believe that we can get more for the money that we have, and I believe that we can demand better of some of our services," Hiester said. "The primary responsibility of the mayor is to oversee the 'when the crap hits the fan' moment. I don't have a lot of experience with the group that was here for four years and what they have done with emergency services, but as a recently retired police officer I think there are things we could be doing better, and as such I'm the person that can shed some light on that."

Candidates who missed the March 7 deadline will not appear on the ballot of the May 16 primary, said county director of Elections and Voter Registration Gerald Feaser.

Curry can run a write-in campaign for the primary if he so chooses.·Or, the mayor can skip the primary entirely and file nomination papers to appear on the ballot of the Nov. 7 general election as an independent or a third-party candidate, Feaser said.

Candidates can start filing nomination papers to appear on the Nov. 7 ballot as an independent or third-party candidate beginning on Wednesday, March 8. The papers must be filed with the county by Aug. 1 to appear on the general election ballot, Feaser said.

March 22 is the deadline for all candidates who have filed to withdraw their name from the ballot. April 17 is the last day for voters to register to vote for the May 16 primary.
Hiester will face off in the May 16 primary against Republican Robert Givler, another retired Middletown borough police officer who ran for mayor in 2013 and lost to Curry.
In his reasons for running, Hiester said the borough has "neglected" emergency services in recent years. For example, the "seat of borough government" still does not have emergency back-up power since December 2011, when a malfunction knocked out the emergency generators, Hiester said.·
"There is no permanent provision in case we lose power for an extended period, such as in a flood. There are so many other things that need attention and that's where my focus will be, to keep the people of Middletown safe," he said.
That both Givler and Hiester are retired from the MPD is relevant, as the mayor under the Pennsylvania borough code is in charge of the police department.
"The good stewards of our money and our services I think are a thing of the past. I believe that we can get more for the money that we have, and I believe that we can demand better of some of our services," Hiester said. "The primary responsibility of the mayor is to oversee the 'when the crap hits the fan' moment. I don't have a lot of experience with the group that was here for four years and what they have done with emergency services, but as a recently retired police officer I think there are things we could be doing better, and as such I'm the person that can shed some light on that."