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From the Vault: News from the Friday, Feb. 9, 1945, edition of the Press & Journal

Posted 2/13/19

Local boys stationed together in England

Three Middletown boys who are all graduates of the Middletown High School and all of whom were friends in civilian life are stationed at the Air Service …

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From the Vault: News from the Friday, Feb. 9, 1945, edition of the Press & Journal

Posted

Local boys stationed together in England

Three Middletown boys who are all graduates of the Middletown High School and all of whom were friends in civilian life are stationed at the Air Service Command Depot in England.

They are: Sgt. William P. Myers, 11 W. Main St.; Cpl. Kenneth K. Snavely, 139 E Main St. and Cpl. Newell A. Shireman, 202 N. Catherine St.

The trio are assigned as clerks in warehouses at the England Depot, which is one of the many bases in England helping to keep supplies and equipment moving in the support of the advancing Allied armies in Europe.

Myers is the husband of Mrs. Elizabeth A. Myers, Steelton, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Myers, Centre Square, town.

Before entering the Army in July 1943, he worked for the Rome, New York, Air Service Command Depot, as a supervisor.

Snavely is the son of Mrs. William J. Moore, town. Before entering the Army in July 1943, he worked at the Rome Air Service Command as a supervisor. He is a member of the Union Hose Company, No. 1, town.

Shireman is the husband of Mrs. Margaret Myers Shireman, formerly of Centre Square, town, and a son of Edward L. Shireman, town.

Before entering the Army in June 1943, he worked for the Middletown Air Service Command as a storekeeper. He has a brother, William H. Shireman, who is a private in the U.S. Army.

Myers graduated in 1936, Snavely and Shireman in 1933.

Area soldier freed in Luzon prison raid; Felty prisoner of Germans

Tech. Sgt. Dawin O. Patrick, son of Mr. and Mrs., Oliver Patrick, 48 E. High St., Hummelstown, was among the 513 prisoners rescued by American Rangers and Filipino guerrillas in a daring raid on a Luzon prison camp.

Patrick is the first of about 50 men from this area to be released from a Jap prison camp and the second Hummelstown prisoner to get back safely with the American forces.

Tech. Sgt, Charles E. Bistline, an aerial gunner, was released from a Rumanian prison camp Sept. 1, 1944, and has since spent a 30-day furlough at his home.

Another Hummelstown soldier known to be a prisoner is Lt. Warren Felty, whose wife was Martha Weirich, Pine Street, Middletown. He is a German prisoner.

Patrick is a graduate of the Hummelstown High School, class of 1939, and he had been manager of athletic teams. He enlisted in the Army Medical Corps on Feb. 5, 1940, and after brief training at Fort Slocum, New York, he was sent to the Philippines, where he was attached to the staff of Stern berg General Hospital, Manila, in May 1940.

While working in an Army library in Manilla, he helped gather material for the book “The Cathedrals and Ancient Churches of the Philippines.”

He was taken prisoner following the fall of Corregidor in May 1942, and he was interned in the Jap Military Prison Camp No. 1 at Manila.

It was not until the next February, however, that Patrick’s parents definitely learned that he was a prisoner. Since that time, they received several postcards from him in the last two years.

The last letter Mrs. Patrick received from her son was written March 6, 1942, at which time he was on Bataan and was in good health, but the letter was not received until the following August.

$20,000 verdict given against D.W. Berstler

A jury in Dauphin County Common Pleas Court, at Harrisburg, before President Judge Hargest, last Friday afternoon, awarded $20,000 to Miss Freda P. McNeal, Huntingdon County, in her damage suit against Donald Wilson Berstler, R.D. Elizabethtown, and formerly employed in Middletown.

The jury found that Miss McNeal lost her right leg below the knee as the result of injuries received on June 4, 1944, when she was struck by Berstler’s automobile near the Penn-Harris Airport. Attorneys for Berstler recently filed an application for parole, but this was denied by the Dauphin County Courts.

Berstler had been sentenced to jail after being convicted of charges of failing to stop and render assistance following the accident in which Miss McNeal was injured. Due to the fact that Berstler was a war-worker, he was sentenced to serve his jail term on weekends.

During the testimony in court, it was shown that the girl was pinned against a guard rail despite the efforts of a companion to pull her to safety, and it was alleged that Berstler left the scene and went to the home of a sister in Hummelstown, returning to the scene later in the night.

Apartment fire causes $2,000 damage

Damages were placed at more than $2,000 when a fire of undetermined origin partly destroyed a converted apartment building at the rear of 221 E. Main St., Hummelstown, on Tuesday night.

Two families were forced to flee in the icy weather to the homes of nearby relatives. Upon investigation, it was found that the fire, which started on the first floor of the one-time garage on the property of Homer Hummel Strickler, attorney, ate its way quickly to the roof of the two-story frame building before it was discovered shortly after midnight by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Seesholtz, occupants of one of the second-floor apartments.

They roused Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brunner and their infant daughter, Patsy, in the adjoining apartment and then sounded an alarm.

Hot buys

• Herman U. Horst’s second annual Spotted Poland China sale, 1 p.m. Feb. 22. 50 bred gilts, 10 fall boars and 5 service boars. C.S. Erb and Company Sales Barn, Middletown.

• Men’s good-looking shirts, fancy patterns and plain colors, full cut and well made. $1.75 to $2.46. Melman’s, South Union Street, Middletown.

Other headlines

• Highspire folks are injured in collision

• Infantile paralysis drive ends Feb. 15

• Sisters die within 18 hours of each other in Mount Joy