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Full Penn State board approves tuition hikes for fall 2017-18, including 2.49 percent increase for Penn State Harrisburg

Posted 7/21/17

A 2.49 percent increase in tuition for resident students entering Penn State Harrisburg this fall for the 2017-18 semester was approved by the full Penn State University Board of Trustees during the …

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Full Penn State board approves tuition hikes for fall 2017-18, including 2.49 percent increase for Penn State Harrisburg

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A 2.49 percent increase in tuition for resident students entering Penn State Harrisburg this fall for the 2017-18 semester was approved by the full Penn State University Board of Trustees during the board’s meeting at Penn State Harrisburg on Friday, July 21.

The 2.49 percent increase equals $173 more per semester.

The full board met at Penn State Harrisburg for just the fourth time in the 50-year history of the campus. The full board last met here in 1999, and before that in 1988 and in 1980.

Non-resident undergraduate students at Penn State Harrisburg will see a tuition increase of 3.85 percent.

The tuition increase for Penn State Harrisburg is the same as that proposed for resident students at other branch campuses including Abington, Altoona, Berks and Erie.

Otherwise, the full board also approved a 2.35 percent tuition increase ($155 per semester) for resident students at other branch campuses including Brandywine, Hazleton, Lehigh Valley, Schuylkill, Worthington Scranton and York, as well as the online World Campus.

For lower-division, undergraduate resident students entering Penn State’s main campus at University Park in the fall, tuition will be going up 2.74 percent, or $232 per semester.

The tuition increase for these students at main campus is the third lowest increase since 1967, behind only the 2.29 percent increase in 2016-17 and the 2015-16 freezing of base tuition for all resident undergraduates, according to a news release posted by Penn State on the main university web site.

Tuition will go up 3.85 percent in the fall, or $605 more per semester, for non-resident undergraduate students at University Park.

For the third straight year tuition will not go up for resident students at eight of the university’s 19 undergraduate campuses — Beaver, DuBois, Fayette, Greater Allegheny, Mont Alto, New Kensington, Shenango, and Wilkes-Barre.

A board committee in proposing the 2017-18 tuition increases on July 20 cited the lack of a completed budget process by state legislators.

The general support appropriation from the state plays “a critical role in advancing Penn State’s mission, and is primarily used to reduce in-state tuition rates,” according to the news release. The legislative delay has also “tied up” funding for agricultural extension, and for the Hershey Medical Center.

“We have moved ahead with our proposed budget despite the uncertainty of our appropriation because the operations of the university must continue, as well as our commitment to students and their families,” said Penn State President Eric Barron.

“If necessary, we will adjust our fiscal plan as we learn more from the commonwealth. However, this is not something that is easily accomplished and would carry with it serious impact, not only to the educational mission of Penn State and affordability for our students, but also to our research and extension efforts, as well as our clinical operations in Hershey.”

Fees

Regarding fees other than tuition, for the third straight year the student Information Technology Fee will be kept frozen at $252 per semester for full-time students.

The Student Activity Fee and Student Facilities Fee are being combined into one fee, the Student Initiated Fee. The new combined fee will range from $173 to $236 per semester for students at Penn State Harrisburg and the other branch campuses.

At University Park the Student Initiated Fee will go up by $36 per semester to $258 per semester.

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