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Here’s to 2019, and the mysteries that await: Editorial

Posted 1/2/19

We sit here on the edge of the new year, merely several days into 2019.

It’s been so far, so good, we would guess, for many of you. That’s what the change in the calendar usually means …

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Here’s to 2019, and the mysteries that await: Editorial

Posted

We sit here on the edge of the new year, merely several days into 2019.

It’s been so far, so good, we would guess, for many of you. That’s what the change in the calendar usually means — a fresh start, a clean slate, a new ballgame, whichever figure of speech you prefer.

It can be an exciting time, when we look ahead and try to improve our lives, hope for the best for our families, and decide to be better people — healthier, maybe, or nicer, or more involved in the community.

It’s amazing what power that flip of the calendar holds.

We don’t know what will happen in 2019. No one does.

We might have a medical breakthrough that transforms our world. We might have stock growth that will make investors around the world ecstatic.

Of course, the opposite is true. We might have a pandemic that will spread disease around the world. We might have a stock slide that will chill our economy severely.

There is always something waiting around the corner, and many of these events are things we don’t consider possible.

“Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities. Truth isn’t,” Mark Twain once said. We can’t imagine unprecedented events that stand before us for the very reason that they are unprecedented. They have never happened before.

It’s hard to imagine that when New Yorkers rang in the new year of 2001 that any of them thought that the World Trade Center would not be standing by the time that 2002 came around. And yet it happened.

It was at unfathomable event, and while we have recovered in many ways, we will never be the same.

But locally, we know there will be some big issues that will make headlines this year.

Three Mile Island is scheduled to close in 2019. TMI owner Exelon announced those plans in 2017. TMI has not made a profit in six years, according to Exelon.

Local leaders are trying to take the necessary steps to ensure that doesn’t happen. About 675 people work there. Does the state Legislature have the power — and the will — to prevent it, possibly by adding nuclear power to the state’s energy portfolio? Time will tell.

What will happen with Middletown’s lawsuit with Suez, which has a 50-year lease with the borough for its water and sewer systems? Middletown has a lawsuit pending in federal court against Middletown Water Joint Venture LLC, which includes Suez, to eliminate a surcharge Suez added in order for it to recover revenue from what Suez says was a shortfall in water usage in the first three years of the lease — from Jan. 1, 2015 through the end of 2017. Many borough leaders want to get out of the lease completely.

That lawsuit is just one of several with which the borough is involved, and its spending of legal fees approached $1 million in 2018.

These are just two of the local issues that you will be talking about and we will be reporting on this year. These are two that we know about. But what awaits us that we haven’t even considered?

That’s the mystery that a new year brings.

We wish you all a Happy New Year.