locally owned since 1854

Legalizing marijuana would be a bad move for state; it's a dangerous drug: Letter to the Editor

Posted 2/20/19

Editor’s note: The following originally was written as a presentation for Lt. Gov. John Fetterman’s marijuana legalization “listening tour” in Mechanicsburg last week. …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Legalizing marijuana would be a bad move for state; it's a dangerous drug: Letter to the Editor

Posted

Editor’s note: The following originally was written as a presentation for Lt. Gov. John Fetterman’s marijuana legalization “listening tour” in Mechanicsburg last week.

Drugs, including alcohol, are used because, to some extent, they artificially change our thinking, bodily function, perception, emotions, mood or actions. If they do not produce significant effects, people would not take them. Making them legal or illegal does nothing to change the bottom line in their intended or unintended effects.

Labeling drugs as medical or recreational, revenue raising or budget draining does not change the fact that there are inherit personal, societal and governmental problems.

The government has a role in shaping the future of its people by being judicious, cautionary and practical in its declarations to its people.

From early in history, it has been one of the functions of government to set a high standard for the people it represents in the areas of safety, security and stability. Marijuana has never been proven to be safe, does not bring stability to those affected by its use, nor does it bring a sense of security to our people.

Marijuana has been made medically available without conducting the research that any other drug is required to undergo. This means that the possible beneficial results and the inevitable side effects of its prescribed usage are still in question.

And now, without the standard due process to protect the public, the state of Pennsylvania is considering bypassing normal restraint to legalize this mind-altering substance in our great state.

The standard justification for sanctioning pot sales starts with the mantra, “We will legalize it and tax this vice so that we can fund our government,” when in fact the human and public costs minimize or negate the value of the taxes collected.

The second reason seems to be that other states are legalizing it. This point reads as if two wrongs somehow make a right. Our parents never bought that argument. Why should Pennsylvania?

A third point opines that cannabis is safer than alcohol or opiates. Safer does not mean safe. Not legalizing any additional recreational drugs is far safer.

Making one more mind-altering substance legal, readily available and seemingly acceptable does not take our state in a positive direction.

Pastor Paul Maulfair

Garden Chapel Church

Middletown