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Lytle Farms subdivision plans get OK; development might finally start after years of discussion

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 12/4/19

Londonderry Township supervisors unanimously voted to subdivide land known as Lytle Farms on Monday. 

“Once they get this subdivided away, then they can actually sell it to the people …

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Lytle Farms subdivision plans get OK; development might finally start after years of discussion

Posted

Londonderry Township supervisors unanimously voted to subdivide land known as Lytle Farms on Monday. 

“Once they get this subdivided away, then they can actually sell it to the people who want to develop it. That’s when you’ll see the full plan, the full development, and all that kind of stuff,” Londonderry Codes and Zoning Officer Jeff Burkhart said.

Lytle Farms is on Route 230, just across the Swatara Creek from Middletown’s eastern edge. A housing development has been discussed for the land for many years, including a previous proposal for 1,600 homes.

The subdivision plans essentially separate land to the north of Route 230 from land to the south. The plans do not propose any development on the land. However, township officials have previously said that the northern land would be developed into a logistic facility and a traditional neighborhood development would be constructed on the southern tract by another developer.

That housing development hinged on other land in Londonderry being developed, officials have said.

The subdivision plans, which were submitted by Core5 Industrial Partners, were recommended by the township planning commission Nov. 18.

Project engineer John Murphy said Monday land development plans would be forthcoming. After the November planning commission meeting, Core5 Director of Development Brian Reisinger told the Press & Journal that he estimated that land development plans would be submitted in three to four months.

The supervisors also approved waivers for a preliminary plan and for the plans to show existing features because, as Murphy noted, no development is proposed with the subdivision plans. 

During the planning commission meeting, Murphy said the whole tract is 272 acres on either side of Route 230 with about 55 acres to the north and 217 acres to the south. 

The deed was transferred to Tuck-A-Way LLC in 2009 for $4.6 million. The deed notes that entire tract is 333.29 acres.

During the planning commission meeting, Murphy said a tract bordered by Route 230 to the south and Swatara Creek Road was subdivided prior. Reisinger told the Press & Journal that Core5 planned to also buy that tract.