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Saturday's Market location under contract with developer for commercial use: township manager

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 10/8/19

Core5 Industrial Partners — the company that wants to develop the former School Heights Village and part of the Lytle Farms development — has Saturday’s Market under contract, …

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Saturday's Market location under contract with developer for commercial use: township manager

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Core5 Industrial Partners — the company that wants to develop the former School Heights Village and part of the Lytle Farms development — has Saturday’s Market under contract, according to Londonderry Township Manager Steve Letavic.

“I think the idea for Saturday’s Market would be to develop it into a commercial use of some kind. I am not certain what that may be,” Letavic told the Press & Journal via text.

Tuesday, one of the Saturday’s Market tenants, KT Media, announced on its Facebook that it received word that Saturday’s Market was closing its doors Nov. 30.

A letter dated Oct. 7 from the Hershey-based law firm JSDC Law Offices to a tenant was shared to the Facebook group Elizabethtown, PA. The letter states that the firm represents Saturday’s Market.

“Please be advised that Saturday’s Market is ceasing operations and closing permanently effective Monday, December 2, 2019,” the letter reads.

The tenant was told that the lease would be terminated Dec. 1 and to vacate the building and remove all property prior to then.

“The operation and function of the market will continue to be as usual until closing. Every attempt will be made to assist you with this transition,” the letter said.

Saturday’s Market and JSDC Law Offices did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Saturday’s Market’s website boasts over 150 vendors both inside and outside. Vendors ranged from donuts to makeup to religious items to sports memorabilia.

The owner, Rodman Rose, passed away in May 2018.

According to Rose’s obituary, the market was started by his father, Bernard, in 1957 who named it the Big M. The market was later named Saturday’s Market. Rodman joined the business in 1964.

The announcement comes just over a month after the Londonderry Township Board of Supervisors unanimously approved two zoning map amendments that would clear the way for development of three tracts of land along Route 230 — land behind Ed’s Landscaping and two former housing developments known as Lytle Farms and School Heights Village.

The zoning map amendments included conditional uses within the township’s C-2 commercial district including logistic facilities such as warehouses and distribution facilities; mini-warehouses and storage unit facilities; and business parks.

The zoning amendment also expanded the C-2 commercial district within the township, including to now encompass the former School Heights Village development, which is a 197-acre tract behind Saturday’s Market.

During a Sept. 3 public hearing to consider the zoning map amendments, township solicitor Mark Stewart explained that in a zone there are specific uses that the property owner has the right to use. By contrast, these conditional uses means that a developer would have to filed a petition with the supervisors, who would then consider granting the petition.

According to Letavic, a conditional use application has been filed for the land behind Saturday’s Market.

During the hearing, township officials said that Core5 was also interested in developing the northern portion of the former Lytle Farms neighborhood development, and another developer, Vision Group Ventures, was interested in a tract behind Ed’s Landscaping.

“They both have projects in mind that would entail essentially logistics centers or distribution centers or warehousing, whatever term you want to put on it,” Stewart said during the hearing.

Both Core5 and Vision Group Ventures have offered $15 million to help install public sewer lines that would run along Route 230.

Under the 1966 Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act, known as Act 537, municipalities such as Londonderry are required to develop a sewage facilities plan.

Londonderry’s plan said there were malfunctioning on-lot disposal systems in the township, particularly in the Londonderry Estates housing development and Sewer District No. 3. It called for public sewer to be installed in the development and Sewer Districts No. 2 and 3.

Londonderry Estates’ public sewer is to be operational by 2021, and a public sewer system running along the entire Route 230 by 2026. The price tag of bringing public sewer to the township is estimated at $27.5 million, including $26 million for the Route 230 sewer alone.