locally owned since 1854

The real building blocks for a community's future

Posted 5/13/14

 

If you take the time, it’s easy to find wonderful examples of family and community around every corner in the Middletown area:

 

• Last weekend marked the 100th birthday of Strites’ Orchard. Mother Nature’s downpour …

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The real building blocks for a community's future

Posted

JoeViewpointsIf you take the time, it’s easy to find wonderful examples of family and community around every corner in the Middletown area:

 

• Last weekend marked the 100th birthday of Strites’ Orchard. Mother Nature’s downpour failed to deter the shine of the celebration at this local treasure.

 

We’ve reported this family-owned and operated business is continuing to prosper and grow thanks to the talents of four generations of Strites. You can bet the senior members are proud as they reflect on their legacy handed down to the younger members of the family who have made the commitment to respect and honor the land with new and exciting ventures.

 

• This weekend will mark the cinematic premiere of a film that is the passion of Middletown Area High School alumnus Max Einhorn. Max’s film, "My Father, The Old Horse,'' will be shown at the historic Elks Theatre at 2 p. m. on Sunday, May 18. Free admission also includes a showing of the 1979 blockbuster, "The China Syndrome.''

 

“My Father, The Old Horse'' is the culmination of three-year effort by Max – a project originally intended to serve as a thesis film project while he was a student at Temple University. The film was honored as "Best Undergraduate Film” at the university.

 

In Max’s words, “The film evolved into a much grander portrait of a family, small town, and a reminder of a very familiar incident – the accident at Three Mile Island.” The fact that Max, now a resident of New York City, decided to show his work at the Elks and open the event for free for the entire area is an example of a true sense of community. 

 

• Those of you who grew up in the Middletown area probably remember reading the Press And Journal most of your lives. As one of the oldest newspapers in Pennsylvania, we have a rich heritage dating back 160 years. Like Strite’s, we are a proud fourth-generation family business.

 

In 1924, my wife’s great-grandfather, Harry B. Fox, bought both weekly and daily Journal publications which merged with the Middletown Press in 1962 to become its latest incarnation, the Press And Journal. Our family will proudly continue to be a part of the town, to know its people and to record happenings for future generations.

 

Creating a vision for the future begins with an inventory of a community’s assets. Call me a romantic, but a real community is not the streets, the buildings or the government offices. It’s the people.

 

It’s time to recognize our families, our businesses, our churches and our community organizations as the real building blocks for a successful future.