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Watch speeding in work zones: cameras will take your photo and you will get ticket via mail

Posted 11/6/19

Starting this month, automated systems will be deployed to catch people speeding in highway work zones throughout Pennsylvania, officials with the state Department of Transportation and the …

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Watch speeding in work zones: cameras will take your photo and you will get ticket via mail

Posted

Starting this month, automated systems will be deployed to catch people speeding in highway work zones throughout Pennsylvania, officials with the state Department of Transportation and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission announced last Wednesday.

Each system will be mounted atop a vehicle, and have a camera that takes photos of the license plate of any vehicle going 11 mph or more over the work zone speed limit, Secretary of Transportation Leslie Richards said.

The systems will only be used in active work zones where highway workers are present.

For the first two months, the systems will be deployed on a pilot basis and no violations will be issued.

Violations are expected to be issued starting in early 2020.

Registered vehicle owners will receive a warning letter for a first offense, a violation notice and $75 fine for a second offense, and a violation notice and $150 fine for the third and all subsequent offenses.

These violations are civil penalties only, officials said, with no points being assessed to a person’s driver’s license.

Locations of where the systems will be deployed will be posted on the web at https://workzonecameras.penndot.gov/. Signs will also be posted in the work zones to let motorists know when the systems are present and operating.

The state has a limited number of the systems, and initially they will be used in work zones that are active in the winter, PennDOT spokeswoman Jennifer Kuntch told the Press & Journal.

Highway workers aren’t the only victims of traffic accidents in work zones. The majority of people who die in work zone traffic accidents are motorists and their passengers, Kuntch said.

“The Automated Work Zone Speed Enforcement program isn’t about issuing violations, it’s about saving lives,” Richards said. “Last year, 23 motorists were killed in a Pennsylvania work zone. Through this program we are urging motorists to slow down and pay attention while driving.”