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Work may start soon on Lower Swatara UPS hub

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 6/12/19

Lower Swatara Township residents might see work on the site of a new UPS distribution hub in the next several months.

During their June 5 meeting, the commissioners gave UPS permission to move …

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Work may start soon on Lower Swatara UPS hub

Posted

Lower Swatara Township residents might see work on the site of a new UPS distribution hub in the next several months.

During their June 5 meeting, the commissioners gave UPS permission to move forward with site work once the company’s permits are approved. Commissioner Chris DeHart abstained because he works for UPS.

According to the project’s engineer, Ron Secary, the site work would not include any work on the building itself, including the foundation.

“We need to build enough to control stormwater on the site while we’re under construction and to install the initial utilities,” Secary said.

UPS wants to begin work as soon as possible, but is still waiting on its permits.

In November, the commissioners conditionally approved plans that call for a 775,033-square-foot hub to sit on 192.19 acres in the 2100 block of North Union Street. In addition to the warehouse, there will be a 3,467-square-foot retail center where packages can be collected and dropped off.

UPS East Region Project Manager Ovidio Irizarry told the Press & Journal that the site work would last about a year, and UPS anticipates breaking ground on the hub itself early next year.

During past meetings, UPS has proposed reconstructing North Union Street from Fulling Mill Road to the two hub entrances — one for trucks and one for cars.

The work would include grading the site and building the employee entrance off North Union Street, which would be used to haul construction materials, although Secary noted that the paving would stop in the area of the future employee parking lot.

The work will also include installing the utilities, including onsite sewer, water and storm sewer. Curbs would be built along the road and around the perimeter of the site, which would help prevent the water from running into the nearby Swatara Creek.

Since the plan was approved, UPS bought the land for $9.5 million, according to the deed filed with the Dauphin County Recorder of Deeds.

UPS wanted to break ground this spring or summer, but UPS’ attorney Mark Stanley said the plan wouldn’t be recorded at the courthouse for another two to three months. Township Planning and Zoning Coordinator Ann Hursh said UPS has been working on getting the plan recorded, including resolving outstanding issues about reconstructing a pump station that would serve the hub, and improving North Union Street.

She said UPS gave her plans for North Union Street improvements last Monday, and Secary said they presented the township municipal authority engineer with designs for the pump station.

Part of the holdup is getting permits, including plans for erosion and sediment control and a NPDES permit, or a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit, which according to the Department of Environmental Protection, is required for any discharge to waters in the state.

Stanley said they hope to get the NPDES permit this month.

During the meeting, Commissioner Ron Paul expressed concern about work along North Union Street while constructing access, asking if UPS could post financial security in case any damage is done, even if it may not be required by the township.

Stanley said they would not be opposed to Paul’s suggestion.